ARNAULT

Arnault has been at Styljoux since the end of his apprenticeship in 2016. Now a master penmaker, he works on Special Editions in the prestigious specialties workshop, and is one of very few artisans to do so.

A talented craftsman, Arnault thought all his live that he will become an art teacher. Looking back to his early aspirations he can certainly see some resemblance. 'Both require passion and creativity' he reflects. 'Both require vocation and large dose of respect'

Finding His Rhythm

Arnault studied the flute for six years, often noticing parallels with his work today. As with a Special Edition, it requires passion and talent to produce ethereal sounds. There is a rhythm given by the sliding of a nib on paper.

He favours the flute to the cello or piano. 'The flute requires commitment. The piano is much more popular but the flute has a certain character that I've come to love' he says. 'Having to produce the sounds by blowing air from my lungs, creates a much closer relationship with my flute. It's almost a direct extension of my body' he says. Like his fellow artisans, he's a purist.

Arnault Describes the Le Calibre

'Crafting a writing instrument takes nothing if not patience. A single movement often has forty components.'

THE END OF THE SEARCH AND BEGGINING OF A JOURNEY

The process of hand-finishing a Special Edition is laborious. Learning how to put one together is a never ending process of learning. ' No matter how much you know or how many pens you have assembled there are things you will learn with each pen' Arnault says.

For some models, he is in charge with the pen from start to finish. Creating a writing instrument is akin to creating a piece of art. The artisan has a vision and no two pieces are identical. 'A completed pen has to be perfect. Nothing to be added noting to be taken out' he confesses.

THE   FACTS

1200

HOURS

SPENT  FOR  POLISHING

80

OPERATIONS

INVOLVES  FINISHING  A  PEN